Male Breast Cancer: a reality

male breast exam cancer

You may be thinking: Men don’t have breasts, so how can they get breast cancer?

Even though men don’t have breasts like women, they do have a small amount of breast tissue. The “breasts” of an adult man are similar to the breasts of a girl before puberty. In girls, this tissue grows and develops, but in men, it doesn’t. But because it is still breast tissue, men can get breast cancer. Men get the same types of breast cancers that women do, but cancers involving the parts that make and store milk are rare.

Risk factors of male breast cancer include:

  • Breast cancer in a close female relative
  • History of radiation exposure of the chest
  • Enlargement of breasts (called gynecomastia) from drug or hormone treatments, or even some infections and poisons
  • Taking estrogen
  • A rare genetic condition called Klinefelter’s syndrome
  • Severe liver disease (called cirrhosis)
  • Diseases of the testicles such as mumps orchitis, a testicular injury, or an undescended testicle.

The major problem is that breast cancer in men is often diagnosed later than breast cancer in women. This may be because men are less likely to be suspicious of something strange in that area. Also, their small amount of breast tissue is harder to feel, making it harder to catch these cancers early. It also means tumors can spread more quickly to surrounding tissues.

The lymph system is important to understand because it is one of the ways that breast cancers can spread.

male breast cancer structure

But, not all men with cancer cells in their lymph nodes develop metastases to other areas, and some men can have no cancer cells in their lymph nodes and later develop metastases.

Men can also have some benign (not cancerous) breast disorders.

The most important, like for women, is prevention and the auto examination. Know your body and more likely you will figure out what is not normal.

Stay healthy, be happy!

 

What should be the Cancer treatment main goal?

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When we think about Cancer, the first things that come to our minds, right after the shock and sadness, are chemotherapy and / or radiation treatments. These are very common procedures in western society.

Chemotherapy and Radiation are very effective in killing cancer cells. Radiation is especially effective when targeting external organs, like testicles because that specific part of the body can be isolated and targeted leaving the rest of the body somewhat protected. Chemotherapy is most effective in internal organs.

But, both chemotherapy and radiation destroy the immune system. The bone marrow is where the body produces the immune cells, and it is affected by these treatments. So the immune system will also be affected by these invasive and intense procedures. And, having a defective immune system not only will cause you to get sick more often, but also to develop cancer again, and again…

So, what should be the goal of the treatment? In part, the goal of these treatments is to kill the cancer cells.  But, the other part of the fight against cancer should be to detoxify the body and restore the immune system that was harmed during the chemical fight against the disease.

That is why we should be preventive and not only reactive. There are some important advice in order to do so:

  1. Nutrition is key.  Consume more organic raw foods. Ban the processed foods from your normal diet. Think of the way our grandparents would have eaten, food directly picked from the farm.
  2. Exercise. A good and fun idea is to buy a small trampoline, and jump up and down, this will stimulate your lymphatic system. And, is more important than lifting weights.
  3. Be sure to sweat! The skin is the best way to your body to detox. Drink plenty of water and get rid of the sodas.

Also: leave sugar. Sugar is the primary fuel for cancer cells. It does not matter what treatment you may choose, sugar will have to be taken off your diet.

Learn more about a detox and cancer prevention alternative here

 

Based on a Ty Bollinger’s interview.